Search Results for: myth

Myth 17: Bigger Wheels Roll Faster (Amended)

Note: The previous version of this post referred only to our study about road and all-road bikes. We erroneously extrapolated our study to mountain bikes. We should have known better – we usually don’t publish data that we haven’t validated in … Continue reading

Posted in Myths in Cycling, Testing and Tech, Tires | 18 Comments

Myth 16: Higher Tire Pressure is Faster

This used to be one of the first things you learned as a cyclist: If you want to go fast, make sure your tires are pumped up to the maximum pressure. The harder your tires are inflated, the faster they … Continue reading

Posted in Myths in Cycling, Testing and Tech, Tires | 35 Comments

Myth 15: Marginal Gains

‘Marginal gains’ are the latest buzzword in cycling. The idea is that many tiny improvements can add up to make a meaningful difference. Make 10 changes that each save 3 Watts, and you’ll have gained 30 Watts… Think of Greg … Continue reading

Posted in Myths in Cycling, Testing and Tech | 34 Comments

Myth 14: More Lumens Make a Better Light

As the days get shorter, many cyclists are thinking about lights. How do you measure the quality of a headlight? It’s tempting to look at how many lumens the light puts out. After all, brighter is better, isn’t it? On … Continue reading

Posted in Cycling Safety, Lighting, Myths in Cycling | 47 Comments

Myth 13: Leaning without Countersteering

Glancing at the photo above, you might think that I am turning right (seen from the rider’s view). Actually, I am beginning a left turn. What you see is countersteering – literally the only way we can lean a bike … Continue reading

Posted in Bicycle Quarterly Back Issues, Myths in Cycling, Testing and Tech | 29 Comments

Myth 12: Disc Brakes Work Better Than Rim Brakes

To celebrate Bicycle Quarterly‘s 15th anniversary, we are looking at myths in cycling: things we used to believe, but which we’ve since found not to be true. Disc brakes have become popular on allroad bikes for a variety of reasons. One … Continue reading

Posted in Brakes, Myths in Cycling | 114 Comments

Myth 11: Rear tires should run at (significantly) higher pressure

To celebrate Bicycle Quarterly‘s 15th anniversary, we are looking at myths in cycling: things we used to believe, but which we’ve since found out not to be true. Today, we explain why your bike’s weight distribution does not directly translate into your … Continue reading

Posted in Myths in Cycling, Testing and Tech, Tires | 23 Comments

Myth 10: Stiffer Forks Steer Better

To celebrate Bicycle Quarterly‘s 15th anniversary, we are looking at myths in cycling: things we used to believe, but which we’ve since found out not to be true. This week, we have a ‘double feature’ that looks at fork blades. In … Continue reading

Posted in Framebuilding supplies, Myths in Cycling | 41 Comments

Myth 9: Fork Blades Don’t Flex

When we first started talking about shock absorption and fork blades, it was commonly believed that fork blades didn’t flex significantly. Experts told us: “All the flex in a fork is in the steerer tube, where the lever arm is … Continue reading

Posted in Myths in Cycling, Testing and Tech | 60 Comments

Myth 8: Modern Components are Lighter

To celebrate Bicycle Quarterly‘s 15th anniversary, we are looking at myths in cycling – things we all used to believe, but which we’ve since found out not to be true. During these 15 years we’ve learned a lot, and perhaps the most … Continue reading

Posted in Myths in Cycling, Testing and Tech | 41 Comments

Myth 7: Tubeless Tires Roll Faster

When tubeless tires first became popular on mountain bikes, it was their resistance to pinch flats (above) that made them popular. Off-road, there are few nails or broken bottles that can cause punctures (and even those usually will be pushed … Continue reading

Posted in Myths in Cycling, Testing and Tech, Tires | 82 Comments

Myth 6: Tread Patterns Don’t Matter on the Road

To celebrate 15 years of Bicycle Quarterly, we are examining 12 myths in cycling – things that we (and most others) used to believe, but which we have found to be not true. Today, let’s look at tire tread. “Bicycles don’t … Continue reading

Posted in Myths in Cycling, Testing and Tech, Tires | 89 Comments

Myth 5: An Upright Position is Always More Comfortable

“Raise your handlebars, and you’ll be more comfortable.” It’s one of those almost self-evident ‘truths’ of cycling. And yet the reality is not that simple… To celebrate 15 years of Bicycle Quarterly, we are examining 12 myths in cycling – things … Continue reading

Posted in Bicycle Quarterly Back Issues, Handlebars, Myths in Cycling, Testing and Tech | 31 Comments

Myth 4: Stiffer Frames Are Faster

To celebrate 15 years of Bicycle Quarterly, we are examining 12 myths in cycling – things we (and most others) used to believe, but which we have found to be not true. Today, we’ll look at frame stiffness. When we started … Continue reading

Posted in Bicycle Quarterly Back Issues, Myths in Cycling, Testing and Tech | 40 Comments

Myth 3: Fenders Slow You Down

To celebrate 15 years of Bicycle Quarterly, we are looking at ‘12 Myths in Cycling’ – things that aren’t quite what we (and most other cyclists) used to believe. Part 3 of the series is about fenders. Many cyclists here in … Continue reading

Posted in Bicycle Quarterly Back Issues, Fenders, Myths in Cycling, Testing and Tech | 64 Comments

Myth 2: Titanium is Lighter than Steel

In part 2 of our series ’12 Myths in Cycling,’ we’ll look at why titanium isn’t always lighter than steel. I can hear you saying, “What? Everybody knows that titanium has half the density of steel.” That much is true: The … Continue reading

Posted in Framebuilding supplies, Myths in Cycling, Testing and Tech | 60 Comments

12 Myths in Cycling (1): Wider Tires Are Slower

When we started to publish Bicycle Quarterly 15 years ago, it seemed that most of the technical aspects of bicycles were well-established. And yet, as we tested many different bikes, we started to question many of the things we had … Continue reading

Posted in Myths in Cycling, Testing and Tech, Tires | 53 Comments

Riding 600 km (Almost) Non-Stop

As part of preparing this year’s Paris-Brest-Paris (PBP), riders qualify by riding 200, 300, 400 and 600 km brevets. More than just preparation for the long ride in France, these rides are fun challenges in their own right. The last … Continue reading

Posted in PBP Preparation | 13 Comments

Technology Transfer from Motorbikes and Cars

In recent years, there has been a lot of technology transfer from motorcycles and cars to bicycles. Modern bikes finally have tubeless tires and disc brakes, both introduced in cars as early as the 1950s! Cyclists tend to be a … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 42 Comments

Back in Stock and New: Framebuilding Parts

Good news: The long-awaited Kaisei ‘TOEI Special’ fork blades are back in stock. Even better news: We worked with Kaisei to maximize their length, so there is a little extra for bikes with ultra-wide tires, or to cut off the … Continue reading

Posted in Framebuilding supplies | 2 Comments