Ted King – Gentleman Gravel Racer

2019 will be remembered as the year when gravel racing started to be on equal terms with the great races of Europe. When Pro Tour riders appear at the Belgian Waffle Ride, you know that it’s not just a local event any longer. And yet, the fun part of the sport – above the leaders at Landrun 100 – and the ability for all riders to enter, remain undiminished.

Gravel racing forms a great counterpart to the increasingly sterile, big-money world of professional road racing. Where else can you line up alongside the big names, and even have them cheer you on at the finish?

Few riders embrace this ethos better than Ted King. Even though he’s a retired pro racer himself, he now stands out in the field, in his unbranded jersey, as the quintessential gentleman racer. It’s all the more exciting when he takes podium finishes in almost every event he enters. Recently, he was interviewed on Gravel Cyclist about how he discovered gravel racing, what he is looking for in a gravel bike and tire, and where the sport is heading.

In addition, Ted’s own series, ‘G-Road to Kanza,’ has a new video report from the Belgian Waffle Ride. See Ted duke it out with riders who came straight off the Spring Classics. Click on the images above to enjoy the podcast and video!

About Jan Heine

Spirited rides that zig-zag across mountain ranges. Bicycle Quarterly magazine and its sister company, Rene Herse Cycles, that turns our research into the high-performance components we need for our adventures.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to Ted King – Gentleman Gravel Racer

  1. PK says:

    I ride gravel in the Midwest a bit, but on a recent camping trip to Kansas I was astounded by what seemed to be flint axe heads partially buried, business side up, on all the rural roads. 1-4 inch tall razor sharp rocks everywhere.

    • Jan Heine says:

      The Flint Hills of Kansas are infamous for their tire-destroying properties. Maybe that is why Dirty Kanza is so popular – it adds an element of drama to the race…

      • Ron says:

        Sort of our own little Paris-Roubaix? Without the frequent cold weather they have in Northern France that time of year.

      • Jan Heine says:

        I remember when every gravel race in the U.S. had ‘Roubaix’ in the name. Around here, there was the Spokane River Roubaix, which was a lot of fun, even on 21.5 mm tubulars!

  2. singlespeedscott says:

    Racing with the Pro’s is like mtb racing back in the day

    • Jan Heine says:

      I was just thinking about this, how mtb racing went from a homegrown sport to having European cyclocross professional like Frischknecht and others join the new sport that offered more opportunities than what they had been doing.

  3. RickH says:

    From watching and listening to Ted it seems like the dirt rides (races) are more taken as fun rather than a race. Somewhat relaxing from the tension and stress of Pro Tour racing.
    Tire choice of course is crucial to this kind of riding and for Ted to espouse what you have promoted for a long time will be testament to ongoing success.

Comments are closed.