Winter 2018 Bicycle Quarterly

The cover of our Winter edition is one of my favorites. It illustrates the story of Natsuko buying her first bike, when she was a college student. Read how she struggled to figure out what it meant when bike magazines listed the price for “frame+fork only,” and how she finally decided to buy a custom-made Alps cyclotouring bike. To bring Natsuko’s story to life, MIYOSHI, who went to art school with her, contributed his iconic gouache paintings – no computer graphics here!

You’ve probably already seen the MAP All-Road in our latest movie. Now you’ll read how the bike fared during our 30-hour adventure. Mitch Pryor combined modern technology with classic features and added the versatility of racks, lights and fenders. Is this the future of randonneur bikes?

At a much more affordable price point, the All-City Gorilla Monsoon looks remarkably similar. Does it offer similar performance, too? And how does it compare to its cousin, the Surly Midnight Special we tested a few months ago?

Rides don’t come much more epic than the Transcontinental Race. Jonah Jones takes you on this incredible adventure. Somehow, he found time during the race to capture stunning photos. He takes you to places that you’ll want to visit some day.

Firefly makes some of the best titanium bikes in the world. We visit their workshop and document what makes their bikes so special.

In France, the iconic Idéale saddle are being made again. We traveled to Toulouse, at the foot of the Pyrenees mountains, to discover the secret behind this amazing revival. Plus, we bring you the full history of this innovative saddle maker.

Idéale saddles felt right at home during Peter Weigle’s French Fender Day. Join us as we enjoy a day among friends and their cyclotouring bikes deep in the woods of Connecticut.

Nicola Barra was the mad genius of cyclotouring bikes, and the one we feature in this issue is madder than most. Just consider: an aluminum frame with ovalized tubes, a 1930s racing derailleur converted to wide-range gearing, and a weight that would not have been out of place at the Concours de Machines technical trials. All with beautiful patina, presented in beautiful studio photos.

We celebrate the 80th anniversary of Cycles Rene Herse with an illustrated timeline. Above is Lyli Herse overlooking the Mississippi River during a 1960s trip to the U.S.

Natsuko takes you on a ride through New England during harvest time, a scientific study looks at how Q factor affects performance and the potential for injury, we test products and review books… Like every Bicycle Quarterly, this 112-page edition will give you many hours of reading enjoyment.

Click here to subscribe today, and you’ll get your copy in time for the holidays.*

*Holiday delivery guaranteed for U.S. addresses.

About Jan Heine, Editor, Bicycle Quarterly

Spirited rides that zig-zag across mountain ranges. Bicycle Quarterly magazine and its sister company, Compass Cycles, that turns our research into the high-performance components we need for our adventures.
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6 Responses to Winter 2018 Bicycle Quarterly

  1. sisyphus says:

    Nothing warms the soul more than a chair parked adjacent to a hissing wood stove, and a winter issue of BQ waiting to be unfurled.

  2. marmotte27 says:

    Just reading the summary, that must be one of the best issues if not the best of the last five years.

  3. Adam Paiva says:

    I have been seeing all of these old illustrated covers of Japnese mag New Cycling on this instagram. I like them. I wouldn’t mind at all if it was a regular occurrence for BQ.

  4. Peter Chesworth says:

    Always enjoy reading the Winter issue in the blazing Southern hemisphere summer.

  5. That painting brought back memories of my childhood, reading the collection of old Reader’s Digest magazines of the ’50s and ’60s my uncle had: they were filled with lots of hand-made drawings, from the articles to the advertising. (I’m probably the only one of my age who knows about Philco pickups and Royal typewriters)

    It’s refreshing to see how Bicycle Quarterly keeps alive the legacy of valuable magazines filled with great artwork beside well written articles made to be kept in our libraries for years to go. Keep doing the good work!

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