Video: Testing the Open U.P.

Bicycle Quarterly took the Open U.P. to Odarumi, one of the highest passes in Japan. How does a carbon bike for wide tires handle the 2000 m (6600 ft) paved climb? And how does it do on the challenging gravel descent? We made a little video to take you right into the action. Join Bicycle Quarterly in this amazing adventure!

Click on the image above or watch at this link. Make sure you watch it full-screen!

Subscribe to Bicycle Quarterly and receive the Spring issue (BQ 59) with the full story of this adventure!

About Jan Heine, Editor, Bicycle Quarterly

Spirited rides that zig-zag across mountain ranges. Bicycle Quarterly magazine and its sister company, Compass Cycles, that turns our research into high-performance components for real-world riders.
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4 Responses to Video: Testing the Open U.P.

  1. J-D Bamford says:

    Jan – what are your thoughts on all day all’roading on a bike like this which seems great – but apparently doesn’t have any provisions for a front randonneur rack? We’ve been drinking the low-trail rando cool aid for so long…

    • I agree with you, and I did wish for a way to carry my things. On that ride, I carried a camera bag on my back, with my clothes and toothbrush stuffed around the camera. It wasn’t ideal, but it worked. Bikepacking bags allow you to carry things on any bike without racks, but there are compromises. We tested a few setups in the current Bicycle Quarterly. For a trip that is longer than a few hours, a front rack and handlebar bag really are a good solution.

  2. Reuben says:

    What rear cassette on on that thing? looks BIG.

    • I didn’t count the teeth. It’s a test bike for magazines, so it was set up with very low gears. In fact, the low gear was lower than that of Natsuko’s cyclotouring bike, and I never used it.

      Due to a mechanical problem (the Di2 front derailleur lost its adjustment, see Bicycle Quarterly‘s test report), I had only the top 25% and bottom 25% of the gears, but not the middle 50%. It actually wasn’t a problem on this mountainous course, as I was either climbing or descending.

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