Myth 17: Bigger Wheels Roll Faster

As part of our series on myths in cycling, let’s look at wheel size and how it affects speed. Even though tires have grown wider in recent years, many bike makers have stuck with 700C wheels. It’s a size that is familiar to road cyclists, and there is also a fear that smaller wheels won’t roll as fast.

When we developed our Rene Herse / Compass tires, we tested all aspects of how tires perform – especially on rough roads. During that testing, we found that the common wheel sizes – 26″, 650B and 700C – all roll at the same speed.

At first sight, it makes sense that a larger wheel might roll better over obstacles and road irregularities: With a larger wheel, the bump becomes comparatively smaller, effectively smoothing out the road. And we all know that a wheel rolls faster on a smoother road…

Why doesn’t it work like that in real life? The difference between common wheel sizes is relatively small: Only about 10% between a 700C and a 26″ wheel (above). The approach angle – the angle at which the wheel is hitting an obstacle – is almost the same for both wheel sizes. Even when hitting a rock that is 4″ (100 mm) tall at its corners, the difference in approach angle is less than 2° – not enough to make a difference.

We tested this in our famous ‘rumble strip’ testing: The rumble strips of a brand-new highway provided a uniform ‘rough surface,’ allowing us to test different setups on rough roads. (Testing on real gravel roads does not work well, because there is too much variability depending on how many large and small rocks you hit during a run.)

We tested otherwise identical 38 mm-wide tires (Schwalbe Marathon HS) in three wheel sizes: 700C, 650B and 26″. We measured the power required to pedal the bike at 32.2. km/h (20 mph). Basically, that is like riding the roughest parts of a course like Dirty Kanza at race speeds.

We tested on a day with no wind and with constant temperatures. We did three test runs with each setup. This allowed us to perform a statistical analysis – ensuring that we are reporting real results, and not just ‘noise’ in your data. The columns above show the averages for those three runs. The dark part of each column is the ‘confidence interval.’ If differences between wheels fall within the dark parts, they are not statistically significant. This means they may be caused by noise in the data (such as small changes in rider position, wind, temperature, etc.).

Looking at the first three columns, there are very small differences between wheel sizes. They fall within the dark bars – they were not statistically significant. This means that they are too small to tell whether they were real or not. (And in real life, they are also too small to matter.)

The fourth column shows what happens when you reduce the air pressure slightly. We did that to check whether small variations in tire pressure might affect the results – it’s impossible to inflate tires repeatedly to exactly the same pressure. The differences were small – not enough to affect our results. (This is why we tested with stiff tires. With supple tires, pressure makes a bigger difference, and lower pressures roll faster on rough terrain.)

We also tested each setup on the smooth pavement next to the rumble strips. This allowed us to confirm that our tires really were identical in their construction, and only differed in their wheel size. We wanted to make sure that the tires in the three wheel sizes were not slightly different in some way that made them roll slower or faster. There was a little variability – the inevitable ‘noise’ – but the differences were not statistically significant. Even on the smooth pavement, the three wheel sizes required the same power.

The conclusion: Even on very rough surfaces, the three common wheel sizes (700C, 650B, 26″) offer the same performance. They roll at the same speed on smooth pavement, too.

If large wheels don’t roll faster, why do many mountain bikers report that 29ers with their large wheels feel faster than smaller-wheeled bikes? I suspect that this has more to do with the handling – how easily the front wheel gets deflected. On a mountain bike, a wheel with more inertia will climb out of ruts better and roll over bumps with less deflection, and that probably is a good thing that allows you to go faster.

On the road, larger wheels also make the bike more stable – but here this isn’t always good. The best road bikes offer nimble handling that makes them easy to place on the road. With wider tires, the bike becomes more stable – too stable for many riders’ tastes.

To keep the nimble handling of a racing bike, you need to keep the rotational inertia of the wheels the same – by reducing the rim diameter to make up for the taller (and heavier) tire. That is why 650B wheels are popular for all-road bikes.

Rotational inertia affects not only the handling, but also how the bike feels when you rise out of the saddle and rock the bike from side to side: If your wheels have too much inertia, the bike becomes harder to rock – and that may actually slow you down.

Conversely, racing bikes have stuck with large 700C wheels even though smaller wheels would be lighter and – in theory – ‘spin up’ faster. I suspect that you need some inertia to push against when you rise out of the saddle. As with the bike’s handling, you probably want just the right amount of rotational inertia from your wheels.

What does this mean in the real world of high-performance all-road bikes? We’ve already shown in the first part of this series that wider tires roll no slower than narrow ones. So there is no need to get a second, ‘go-fast’ wheelset with narrow tires for your all-road bike.

However, you do want to go to smaller wheels if you want to keep the nimble handling that makes a road bike so enjoyable. And avoid heavy tires: Wide tires have more rubber, and the effects of a lightweight tire are much more pronounced than they are on a narrow-tired racing bike.

In practical terms, here are the wheel sizes that I like best:

  • 700C x 28 mm
  • 650B x 42 mm (with aluminum rims)
  • 650B x 48 mm (with carbon rims)
  • 26″ x 52 mm (with aluminum rims)

When you calculate the rotational inertia for all these wheels, you’ll find that they come out the same. That is why bikes with these wheels feel very similar.

How your bike handles also depends on personal preference and on your terrain. If a road bike doesn’t feel stable enough for you, you can go up a wheel size to gain stability. That is one of the reason why we offer our Rene Herse offers tires in many sizes.

More information:

Posted in Myths in Cycling, Testing and Tech, Tires | 32 Comments

Celebrating Earth Day

Today is Earth Day – a day to celebrate our planet and think about what each of us, in our daily lives, can do to protect it. As cyclists, we get to enjoy nature in immediate ways: As we pedal over hill and dale, we feel the landscape, we smell it, and we become part of it. We also can make a great contribution to preserving it.

Cycling as a commuter can replace car trips and make a significant impact on the biggest threat facing our planet: climate change. It can also do the opposite, if I ride in distant places and drive (or even fly) to the start of my rides. Few of us can live car- and plane-free lives, so I think of myself as having a ‘carbon allowance.’ If I travel overseas, I try to combine trips that meet suppliers, visit family and ride my bike. Still, flying uses much of that ‘carbon allowance.’ In daily life, I ride from my doorstep – or take the train – when it’s possible.

The things we buy have a large impact, too: Manufacturing and distributing goods takes a large portion of the resources we consume. Buying quality things that I enjoy for a long time reduces the impact considerably. Do I need five bikes? Perhaps I would enjoy one truly great bike more? This wouldn’t just reduce the manufacturing by 80%, but the great bike will last longer, too.

When we shop, do we really need same day delivery? Do we want drivers to head out from distribution centers with just our package in their cars? Or is standard ground shipping, transported together with thousands of other parcels in a fuel-efficient truck, going to be just fine?

This blog is read by many in the bike industry, and it’s important to remember that, as manufacturers, our actions have a big impact. Let’s try to make products that can be enjoyed for a long time. Let’s support them in the long run. Can we prolong the lifespan of our parts by making them easy to upgrade? Sometimes, we can: Our new Rene Herse 11-speed cranks use a chainring that can be installed on all cranks we’ve made since 2011, bringing them up to the newest spec.

An aspect that we hear little about is reducing waste in production. This starts with selecting manufacturing processes that don’t waste material. For example, forging cranks (above) isn’t just stronger, it also uses just the right amount of metal. It continues with designing our parts carefully – recalls aren’t just dangerous for customers, they also waste a lot of parts. And it finishes with supervising production to make sure all our parts meet quality control from the onset. The latter is a bigger problem than I thought: When I visited the component plants in Taiwan, I was shocked by the size of the junk bins full of parts that were rejected before they even left the factory.

Looking back at the history of Earth Day, we’ve come a long way: No longer do we suggest that selecting a paper bag instead of plastic at the grocery store has a meaningful impact. Yet in many other ways, our consumption of resources has spiraled out of control. Each of us can make a difference. This doesn’t just reduce our own impact, but also can inspire others to do the same. Because living consciously creates great joy, and that is contagious.

So let’s celebrate our beautiful Earth by going for a ride today!

Posted in Uncategorized | 7 Comments

Berthoud Bags in Black-on-Black

Our entire line of Berthoud bags is now available in black-on-black, for a contemporary aesthetic that matches modern bikes. Unchanged is the outstanding performance, light weight and durability of these bags.

Leather and canvas may seem like unlikely materials for a high-performance bag, but Berthoud bags aren’t just lighter than most ‘modern’ bags, they also retain their waterproofness in the long run. There is no coating that wears off, nor a liner that adds weight and may leak in the future: The cotton fabric itself swells when it gets moist, making it inherently waterproof.

The black-on-black bags have one difference to the traditional models: The edging of the black-on-black bags is made from Nylon, not leather like the other colors. The edging tends to get some abuse, and if it was made from leather that had been dyed black, the natural tan color would show through after a while. The Nylon is strong and doesn’t change color as it wears.

The design of these bags has been refined over more than half a century, which shows in small details like the elastic closures that are easy to operate with one hand, even while riding.

Berthoud bags are made by hand in France from the best materials, so they aren’t cheap, but they last far longer than other bags we’ve tried. How long? As long as you occasionally treat the leather, they’ll continue to look great after a decade or more of daily use. In fact, I still use the very first Berthoud bag I bought in 1999, twenty years ago.

The Berthoud program includes more than just the iconic handlebar bags:

The small universal bag attaches to the saddle, to a rack, or even to your handlebars – it’s a great way to add carrying capacity and style to your bike.

For more space, the banana-shaped saddle bags are hard to beat. They attach to the saddle rails with a strap…

… or if you have a Berthoud saddle (except the superlight Galibier), you can bolt a small KlickFix attachment to the saddle and mount the bag that way.

I love the small roll-closure bag. Carry it under your saddle or in a bottle cage to carry tools, a tube, and perhaps a lightweight rain jacket. It’s so much nicer and more secure than a cut-off water bottle!

 

The best-kept secret in Berthoud’s range are their panniers. With the ingenious laces, the volume of the panniers is easy to adjust – expand them when you need to carry extra food for a stretch of empty country, or contract them when you wear all your clothes on a cool day. The leather straps compress the bag when you close it – nothing wiggles or rattles.

Our Berthoud panniers attach with simple leather straps and a metal spring that hooks onto the rack. This tensions the bag and prevents it from rattling on rough roads. After touring with these, I miss the features when touring with other bags!

If there is one small drawback to Berthoud bags, it’s that the leather requires a little upkeep. When new, I treat my bags with Obenauf’s Leather Preservative, and if the leather appears to get dry, I repeat – maybe once a year if the bags are used in the rain a lot.

Berthoud also offers their Leather Cleaner & Conditioner (above). It’s less strong and doesn’t penetrate the leather’s surface as much. Mostly, it’s useful for leather saddles that are have softened with age – it doesn’t soften the saddle leather further. We have it in stock, too.

At Rene Herse Cycles, we don’t just offer proven products, but also the spares you need to keep them on the road. The metal springs of the Berthoud panniers don’t wear out, but if you fall or hook a pannier on an obstacle, they can get overstretched. It’s not serious – you can always continue your ride, whereas plastic hooks that snap may well end your trip. We now offer the springs – as well as the leather straps – as spares. Usually, you don’t need the rivets that come with them: Just bend open the hook on the bag and insert the new spring.

With our recent Berthoud shipment also came a restock of the popular saddled: All models and colors are in stock again…

… and so are Berthoud’s popular bar-end mirrors.

Click on the links below for the full program:

Posted in Racks/Bags | 13 Comments

Ted King’s Bike for Land Run 100

In his latest video, Ted King takes us around his bike for Land Run 100 and explains why he chose the Rene Herse Snoqualmie Pass 44 mm all-road tires, rather than knobbies, for the race across the red dirt of Oklahoma.

Click on full screen mode and enjoy!

Posted in Uncategorized | 5 Comments

UD Racks: a modular system for canti and disc bikes

After 2 years of R&D, we’re excited to introduce the UD-2 rack in a version for cantilever brakes. All you need to fit this rack on your bike is a hole in the fork crown and cantilever brakes.

Handlebar bags are popular for touring, randonneuring and bikepacking, because they offer a lot of capacity in an easy-to-access location. They don’t extend beyond the outline of the bike, making it easy to pass through tight spots. Handlebar bags work best when they are supported by a rack.

The Rene Herse UD racks are part of a modular system that uses the same platform, with different struts, to fit bikes with disc and cantilever brakes. Attach it to the canti posts (canti model), to mid-fork eyelets or even to the dropouts (disc model)! And best of all, the struts are available separately, so you can move the rack from one bike to the next.

The new canti-specific UD-2 rack comes with 150 mm struts that fit on bikes with a post-to-crown (PTC) distance of 70 – 98 mm. That specification includes most touring bikes and a lot of mountain bikes. Later this year, we’ll offer longer stays that fit bikes with very generous tire clearances.

Why did it take 2 years to develop the UD-2 rack? When we introduced the UD-1 for disc brakes, we figured it would be easy to modify the stays so they fit on cantilever posts… But a bend in the struts where they connect to the canti posts weakened the tabs, and they kept cracking in our testing. We went from an aluminum to a stainless steel strut, and finally to CrMo steel and a different design that eliminates the bend. Now the UD-2 is strong enough for heavy loads on rough roads. It’s been tested on Nitto’s fatigue testing machines for 10,000s of miles without problems. (Nitto makes Rene Herse racks to our own superlight specifications.)

The new rack joins the UD-1 Disc rack, which attaches to eyelets on the fork or to the dropouts. Both use the same platform…

… and the struts are available separately. This allows you to move the rack from one bike to the next.

Both UD racks are compatible with our innovative light mount: It uses the weight of the light to keep the attachment bolt tight – no matter how much your bike vibrates, the light mount will never come loose. And out on the open road, you’ll appreciate that the angle of the headlight is adjustable by hand.

In other rack news, our ultralight CP-1 rack for centerpull brakes is now available with an elegant light mount for ‘hanging’ SON Edelux lights. The location of the light has been optimized to be close to the rack for optimum protection and elegance, yet it does not cast a shadow on your trajectory during right turns.

At just 168 g, the CP-1 is one of the lightest racks ever made, yet it’s strong enough to carry a heavy handlebar bag on rough roads. (You need a fork with centerpull brake pivots for this rack.)

The CP-1 rack is also available with a ‘standing’ light mount that allows you to run most headlights, or with simple eyelets in case you don’t always want to use a light.

To complement the popular Berthoud saddles, we now offer two Nitto seatposts. The S-65 is a lightweight single-bolt seatpost made to Nitto’s famous quality standards.

The S-83, better known as ‘Frog,’ has two bolts to clamp the saddle ultra-securely. Both are available in 250 and 300 mm lengths.

The Berthoud mirrors, both in the standard aluminum version and with leather inserts (above), have been so popular that it’s been hard to keep up with demand. Now all models are back in stock.

Click on the links above to learn more about these products, or click here to head to the Rene Herse Cycles web site and browse the entire program.

Posted in Racks/Bags | 5 Comments

The Road to Paris-Brest-Paris

Paris-Brest-Paris, one of the world’s oldest long-distance events, is held every four years. 2019 is a ‘PBP Year,’ and thousands of cyclists all over the world are preparing to ride 1200 km (750 miles) from France’s capital to its westernmost city and back.

PBP is not just an epic ride – it’s an amazing event with a long history. Started as a ‘utilitarian race’ in 1891 to promote cycling as a means of travel, it became a professional race for half a century (above, the 1931 winner, the Australian Hubert Opperman). Back then, it was considered so hard that it was run only every 10 years. As PBP morphed into a randonneur event during the 1930s and 1940s, it was run every five, then every four years.

Before we can take the start on the outskirts of Paris in August, we have to prepare. Riding 1200 km in 90 hours (or less) isn’t something that most of us can do without training and planning. The preparation is part of the fun.

The prospect of climbing the bucolic, but relentless, hills of Brittany in August has us head into the mountains with more vigor than usual. The season starts with the new year…

What we lack in form during these early rides, we make up with fun. We aren’t in a big rush, so we stop at stores along the way. We have plenty of time to talk and rekindle our friendships after not seeing much of each other over the winter.

We rediscover favorite roads in the lower parts of the Cascade Mountains, and we breathe fresh mountain air.

We take backroads whenever we can.

We check on what is new since we last came out here. When will the Bush House in Index finally reopen? A nice option for lunch at the half-way point of our customary early-season ride would be nice!

With the coming of spring, the brevet season starts. Now we’re also working on our speed. In a ‘PBP Year,’ we have to ride the brevets, rain or shine: They are required to qualify for the big event. It’s actually the harder rides that create the greatest memories.

Last weekend’s 300 km brevet started with torrential rain. This was followed by ferocious winds as we rode up the coast. We drafted each other in silence, turning the pedals with smooth regularity. The landscape passed almost like a movie as we pedaled on flat roads, buffeted by the gusts.

Wind creates a strange disconnect between the effort and the landscape. Hills make it easy to predict how hard you need to work: You see them coming, you climb them, and then you are usually rewarded with a descent. In the wind, the effort changes with every gust. It makes it difficult to judge how much effort you can maintain.

And yet, we had a good time.

And then, after hours of hard effort, our ride came to a stop when the longest train I’ve ever seen crossed the road at a leisurely pace.

It was a good opportunity to rest and chat with our friends after battling the winds all day.

We headed out again the following day for a 200 km brevet. The course was beautiful, and we were excited to discover new roads…

… and new places.

And toward the end of the weekend, the roads even turned dry!

PBP is still four months away – there is plenty of time to prepare. From now on, the preparation will include our usual adventures as the snow melts in the Cascade Mountains. Fortunately, preparing for PBP requires doing what we like most: riding our bikes.

In the Spring 2019 Bicycle Quarterly, we feature four PBP Anciens (riders who’ve completed the long ride). Each has a different approach to the long ride, each has different goals, and each came away with different impressions. Yet they all agree that PBP changed their lives. And their advice for riders planning the big ride is remarkably similar: Take it one section at a time, and never give up! Click here for more information about this BQ edition.

Photo credits: Evelyne Champaux (Photo 3), Ryan Hamilton (Photo 6), Ryan Francesconi (Photos 9, 10), Tim Wainwright (Photo 16).

Posted in PBP Preparation, Rides | 7 Comments

Safety Advice: Non-Standard Rims and Rene Herse Tires

Safety advice: Rene Herse tires are designed for rims that meet the ETRTO standard, specifically:

  • G height: 5.2 – 6.5 mm
  • Sidewalls with hooks.

Rims that do not meet the current standards – especially hookless rims and rims with sidewalls that have G heights of less than 5.0 mm – are not recommended for use with Rene Herse tires. This is especially important when installing your tires tubeless. Our testing has found that tires mounted tubeless on hookless rims or on rims with lower-than-standard G heights have a less-than-adequate margin of safety against blow-offs. All warranties are void when Rene Herse tires are installed on rims that do not meet the current ETRTO standards.

The ETRTO (European Tire and Rim Technical Organization) sets most standards for car and bicycle tires and wheels, not just for Europe, but for the entire world. Currently, the ETRTO standards are the only standards that exist for tubeless bicycle wheels. They specify the G height of the sidewall at 5.2 mm (for tubeless) and 5.5 – 6.5 mm (for tubes, depending on the rim width). The sidewall must have a hook.

Like most tire makers, we design our tires to meet the ETRTO standards. Why don’t all rim makers follow these standards, too?

In the past, there were some poorly designed rims with overly deep wells and G heights larger than 6.5 mm. Fortunately, these rims have long been discontinued, and cyclists who still have them usually know how to deal with the problems that occur when trying to mount tires on them (as much as this is possible).

These days, we see some rims with G heights that are smaller than the ETRTO standard and no hooks. Even though these rims do not meet the current standards, this makes sense for mountain bikes with carbon rims: A tall sidewall makes the rim vulnerable if the tire bottoms out while the bike is leaning over. The tall G height provides a long lever that can crack the rim. Why hookless? Mostly because the hook is difficult to make with carbon fiber: It requires a complex 3-piece mold for the rim bed.

A ‘hookless’ rim (above) with a shorter G height is stronger and less expensive to make. Stiff mountain bike tires are inflated to ultra-low pressures. They won’t blow off their rims even if there isn’t much sidewall to hold them on. So the non-standard rims have worked fine for mountain bikes. These mountain bike rims usually come with low maximum pressure ratings.

Recently, some rim makers have introduced ‘gravel’ or ‘all-road’ rims that are made to mountain bike standards: without hooks and with low G heights. Unfortunately, these rims don’t work well for high-performance all-road tires.

We can’t say it often enough: The bikes we ride aren’t mountain bikes. They are road bikes with really wide tires. Perhaps it’s not surprising that the industry still misunderstands what gravel and all-road riding is all about: The sport has grown from the bottom up, when riders like us headed into the mountains, found new roads and designed new equipment to ride on them. Some of the established manufacturers are getting it, but many still think inside their traditional boxes of ‘Road’ and ‘Mountain’ bikes. More often than not, they’ve put our bikes into the ‘Mountain’ category.

Here at Rene Herse Cycles, we’ve always thought of them as ‘road’ bikes – that is why we coined the term ‘all-road bike’ for them. Even though my Firefly (above) has 26″ wheels, it’s not a drop-bar mountain bike. It’s a road bike with wide tires. We ride on road tires, and we need road rims for them.

That is why hookless mountain bike rims don’t work well for all-road wheels. All-road tires are supple, and they run at higher pressures than mountain bike tires. This requires an additional margin of safety.

We tested a 650B x 48 mm Switchback Hill tire on a carbon mountain bike wheel with a hookless rim and a G height 0f 5.0 mm. We mounted the tire tubeless, but without sealant (for obvious reasons). The rim is rated to 40 psi, and the tire was fine at that pressure. 40 psi isn’t a lot, even for a 48 mm-wide tire. The tire is rated to 55 psi, so we kept inflating to see what would happen. At 58 psi, the tire blew off. We then repeated the experiment with a second tire, and it blew off at 65 psi. This problem is not limited to Rene Herse tires: Other riders have reported similar blow-offs with tires from other makers.

58 psi is a lot of pressure for a 48 mm tire, but when the tolerances stack up in a bad way (slightly oversize tire and slightly undersize rim) or when the tire isn’t installed perfectly, the blow-off pressure will be lower. Then the margin of safety won’t be adequate. This is neither the tire nor the rim’s fault. It’s simply using the wrong rim for a supple all-road tire.

How much of a difference does the hook make? We put one of the tires on a HED Belgium Plus rim. The G height is the same as on the carbon rim we tested (5.0 mm), but the HED rim has a hook. Even though this is the same tire that already had blown off the rim once, it stayed on at 75 psi. The is no doubt: The hook has a crucial function in keeping the tire on the rim. Other rim and tire makers have tested and found the same: The hook significantly increases the pressure at which the tire safely stays on the rim.

Fortunately, there is another way to increase the margin of safety: Use inner tubes. We put the tire back on the hookless mountain bike wheel, this time with a tube. We inflated it to 75 psi and left it overnight. Nothing happened. We were surprised that even the violent explosion had not stretched the tire, but these beads are strong. (However, we don’t recommend re-using a tire that has blown off the rim.) That is good news: Hookless rims tend to work better when used with tubes – even though we cannot officially recommend them, since they don’t meet the ETRTO standards to which our tires are designed.

Conclusion: All-road bikes are road bikes, and all-road tires are road tires: They should be mounted on road wheels. When you buy new wheels, make sure the rims are designed to the ETRTO standards, and not to mountain bike standards: You want a hook and a G height of 5.2 – 6.5 mm. If your wheels already are equipped with hookless rims, using tubes can increase your margin of safety. And check the maximum pressure ratings, not just of the tire, but also the rim: Don’t exceed them!

Tubeless is great technology – had I used inner tubes on the ride across Odarumi Pass in Japan (above), I probably would have pinch-flatted several times. But tubeless is also an emerging technology. We’ve had to learn how to mount tires (huge blasts with compressors are a sign that the rim is undersize) and how much sealant we need (more than we usually think). Now we are discovering that hookless mtb-style rims don’t work well with all-road tires.

Why do tubeless tires blow off so much more easily? Without a tube reinforcing the joint between rim and tire, it’s much easier for air pressure to force its way out. It’s still extremely rare for tires to blow off, but, with tubeless tires becoming more popular, there have been more incidents than before. They affect all brands of tires – a little while ago, a wheel maker told me of two different tires from a big German tire maker that had blown off his hookless rims that day.

Also remember that tubeless-compatible tires always need liquid sealant inside. If the sealant dries out completely, the tire can break loose from the rim sidewall and deflate suddenly. This can cause the tire to come off the rim, even if rim and tire are sized correctly.

Safety is our biggest concern, not just for our customers, but also for ourselves, because we ride our bikes hard. We’ll continue to test, and we’ll continue to work with rim makers, to drive tubeless technology forward in a safe and responsible way. The last thing we want to worry about during our adventures is whether our tires will stay on their rims! Fortunately, in almost 100,000 km (60,000 miles) on Rene Herse tires and their predecessors, I’ve not experienced a blowout. We’ll work hard to make it remain that way!

Posted in Tires | 34 Comments