Mr. Pedersen – A Man of Genius

David Evans spent more than a decade researching the life of Mikael Pedersen, who is best known for his unconventional bicycles. I have been fascinated by these machines since we photographed a rare racing version for our book The Competition Bicycle (see photo below). I have ridden a reproduction Pedersen, and to my surprise, the unconventional design worked quite well.

David Evans’ book doesn’t have studio photos, but it’s full of historic images and fascinating anecdotes. When Pedersen designed his bicycle, he built a prototype from wood, and rode it for thousands of miles! Later, he built a cycling track in the garden of his house to train and to test bicycles.

I marveled at the Pedersen quadruplet, the record-setting exploits of “Goss” Green on a Pedersen that was not just equipped with pedals, but also with oscillating handlebars that powered the front wheel, making his bike an all-wheel-drive machine! Over 224 pages, David Evans traces the ups and downs of Pedersen, whose brilliant inventions were not limited to bicycles. Until now, the book hasn’t been available in North America… so we decided to add it to our online bookstore.

About Jan Heine, Editor, Bicycle Quarterly

I love cycling and bicycles, especially those that take us off the beaten path. I edit Bicycle Quarterly magazine, and occasionally write for other publications. One of our companies, Bicycle Quarterly Press publishes cycling books, while Compass Bicycles Ltd. makes and distributes high-quality bicycle components for real-world riders.
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One Response to Mr. Pedersen – A Man of Genius

  1. Mitch Kelly says:

    Jan, so glad you started a blog, it looks like it will be endlessly entertaining. I believe numb hands are often caused by pelvic instability. If the seat is too far forward, the rider is forced to use their hands to support too much of their weight. Also, if the seat is too high or the rider is otherwise operating outside of their comfortable range of motion, they may be forced to use their hands to steady themselves on the bike, resulting in over-use and numbness. I believe gloves should be worn to protect the rider’s hands in the event of a crash, and should not be relied upon to prevent numbness. Just my two cents. Once again, thanks for taking the time to start a blog.

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